LBG Summer School

22nd & 23rd June 2018

LBG Medical Biomechanics Summer School Logo

For over 20 years the LBG Biomechanics Summer School has been proud to host what is widely recognised as the world’s premiere Biomechanics conference. Each year the event welcomes a plethora of world recognised lecturers and achieves a sell-out attendance from a diverse clinical background.

The two day event has a ‘hands on feel’ incorporating 8 practical/intimate afternoon workshops in addition to the morning lectures. On the Friday evening there will be an opportunity for you to unwind and network with your fellow professionals at the FREE of charge three course Gala dinner including wine, a feature which always proves to be a success.

Click here to book your placeClick here to download the Summer School brochure

 

 

Speakers

Speakers

Dr. Kade Paterson

BAppSci(Hons), BPod and PhD

Dr Kade Paterson is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow with the Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine at the University of Melbourne, and a Sports Podiatrist with Lakeside Sports Medicine Centre. Kade’s research expertise is in lower limb biomechanics during walking and running, and he has a special interest in the clinical and biomechanical effects of foot-based interventions for musculoskeletal conditions such as foot and knee osteoarthritis. He has published more than 30 peer-review articles in international journals, is a co-author of a biomechanics textbook and has presented at numerous national and international conferences. Kade’s clinical career has spanned 15 years, and he works widely with professional and recreational athletes and clubs from around Australia.

 

Prof. Kim Bennell

BAppSci(physio), PhD

Kim is an academic physiotherapist. She is a Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor and NHMRC Principal Research Fellow in the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Melbourne, Australia. Here she leads the multidisciplinary Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine with a team of approximately 30 research staff and students. She also leads the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Translational Research in Musculoskeletal Pain. Kim’s research focuses on osteoarthritis and it has generated substantial new knowledge about conservative management including efficacy and predictors and mechanisms of effect of a range of treatments (eg. exercise, bracing, taping, shoe orthotics, acupuncture and footwear). Her work has influenced clinical guidelines and practice. Kim has over 300 publications, many in high impact journals such as JAMA, Annals Int Medicine, and BMJ.  She is Secretary General of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International.

 

 Dr. Simon Spooner

BSc, PhD

Dr. Simon K. Spooner qualified as a podiatrist in 1991 from the University of Brighton. In addition to his BSc in Podiatry, he was awarded the Paul Shenton prize for his research into callus. He went on to complete his PhD in podiatry from the University of Leicester in 1997. Simon moved to Plymouth in 1998 where he worked as a lecturer in podiatric biomechanics, sports injuries and orthotic manufacture. Simon eventually went on to become the Head of the School of Podiatry at Plymouth.  In full-time private practice since 2005, Simon continues to research and publish in the field of podiatric biomechanics and speaks internationally on foot orthosis therapy. He provides podiatric care to a premiership rugby club, acts as a professional reviewer to the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association and sits on the advisory board of the Spanish Journal: Podologia Clinica.

 

Prof. Richard Jones

BSc (Hons), PgCert, PhD

Richard is currently Professor of Clinical Biomechanics and Director of the Salford Gait Laboratory at the University of Salford. He is also Salford’s clinical biomechanics lead at the Manchester Institute of Health and Performance. He currently leads the Knee Biomechanics and Injury Research Programme in the School of Health Sciences investigating the typical and abnormal function and treatment of the knee joint. Richard has vast experience of biomechanical movement analysis in a wide range of neurological and orthopaedic conditions but his research focuses primarily on lower limb osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention and rehabilitation and conservative management of knee injuries.

 

 

Dr. Eric Fuller

DPM

Eric graduated from the California College of Podiatric Medicine in 1987.  As a student he won a paper writing contest sponsored by Langer labs. After completing a surgical residency he did a Fellowship in podiatric biomechanics at CCPM. He taught at CCPM for 14 years in the department of biomechanics. He has been in private practice for 15 years.  He has written a chapter on computerized gait analysis and co-wrote a chapter on the tissue stress approach to biomechanics of the foot. He also has published several other papers in peer reviewed journals. Eric’s passion is to distill academic knowledge into practical information that can be used to treat the foot.
 
Professor Sarah Curran
 

BSc(Hons), PhD BSc(Hons) FCPM FFPM RCPS(Glas) SFHEA CSci

Sarah is a Professor of Podiatric Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Wales Centre for Podiatric Studies, Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University. She teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level on various disciplines and is also an Honorary Professor at the National University of Ireland, Galway and Director of Education at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow for the Faculty of Podiatric Medicine. Sarah has held a number of editorships, published widely and presented at national and international conferences. She also holds a number of fellowships and was awarded a prestigious National Teaching Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy in 2016.  Her research and enterprise activities are symbiotic to the creation of practice protocols that have relevance to clinical teaching. She has a particular interest in patellofemoral joint pain, chronic ankle sprains, limb dominance, footwear and orthoses intervention. Sarah works collaboratively locally and worldwide with various health professionals and disciplines in Brazil, Canada, Finland, Iran, Ireland and the USA. 

 

Location

Manchester Marriott Victoria And Albert Hotel Entrance

Manchester Marriott Victoria & Albert Hotel

Getting There:

Address:Manchester Marriott Victoria & Albert Hotel
Water Street
Manchester
M3 4JQ,
United Kingdom

From M6 North: Exit M6 at Junction 30 onto M61 towards Manchester. Continue for 20.9 miles then at the fork keep right heading towards M60 (Manchester Airport, Trafford Park, Liverpool). At junction 12 exit onto M602 towards Salford. Continue onto Regent Road and turn left onto A6042, take the first right onto water Street. Then turn left and the destination will be on your left.

From M6 South: Exit M6 at Junction 21A, onto M62 heading towards Manchester/Bolton/Leeds. After 9 miles merge onto M602 then continue on to Regent Road (A57). Turn left onto A6042, then take the first right onto Water Street (A6143) and then continue on Water Street. Turn left (Destination will be on the left).

From M1: Exit M1 at junction 42 onto M62 towards Manchester/Bradford. Continue onto M60, at junction 12 exit onto M602 towards Salford. Continue onto Regent Road and turn left onto A6042, take the first right onto water Street. Then turn left and the destination will be on your left.

Review 2017

Review 2017

Another year gone and another Biomechanics Summer School successfully pulled off! Dr Kevin Kirby described the event as “one of the best podiatric biomechanics seminars ever”, so with feedback like that, we’re all pretty pleased!

This year’s theme was “Research to Clinic : Making the Leap” and the idea behind it was to draw on expert opinion from a range of different backgrounds. With everything from sport to Rheumatology and core biomechanics to new paradigms, there really was something for everyone. Professor Jim Woodburn commented that the programme was a “smorgasbord of themes”. Thankfully this variety was well received by our delegates and that was largely due to the professionalism of the speakers and their admirable ability to tie their presentations in with each other.

First up on the Friday morning and with no introduction required, the biomechanics legend Dr Kevin Kirby lectured about the plantar intrinsic muscles and the longitudinal arch load sharing system.  For many of us who qualified with the teachings of Root and a “locking midtarsal joint” Dr Kirby’s lecture focused heavily on stiffness rather than locking with regard to the midtarsal joint and the forefoot. It certainly made more sense to a lot of us that the foot needs to be stiff to push off and how this is achieved through the intrinsic muscles. Later that day, Dr Kirby’s workshop gave delegates hands on tips for examining the foot and ankle and on Day 2, he focused on plantar plate dysfunction. Take home messages were that not all plantar plate tears are symptomatic and there is a lot that we can do with conservative management; namely taping and icing.

Dr Luke Kelly followed next with a well-planned presentation about the longitudinal arch. He has published various papers on this topic in recent years and his findings were highly anticipated by many of the delegates. It was no surprise that Dr Kirby had liaised with Dr Kelly for several months prior to the conference and this was reflected in how well their lectures coupled together. In particular, Dr Kelly drew attention to how important the intrinsic foot muscles were in the mechanical operation of the foot. Interestingly he also mentioned that wearing shoes does not decrease the activation of the smaller muscles and that cushioned soles do not decrease sensory feedback. Dr Kelly put his lecture into practice in the afternoon workshop and stressed the importance of putting high load through the plantar fascia.

Many delegates waited with baited breath as Professor Benno Nigg introduced the 3rd lecture. With an outstanding record of research which has led to the establishment of Preferred Movement Pathway Theory, Professor Nigg was a speaker that many of us were looking forward to listening to. He lectured about the smaller muscles about the ankle joint which actually tied in very well with the previous 2 presentations. Professor Nigg wasted no time in telling us to forget about improving core strength and to focus instead on a strong ankle joint. His slides and rationale made perfect sense as he reinforced key points that the smaller muscles across the ankle joint react faster than the larger ones and that strong small muscles increase stability and decrease pain and injury likelihood.  It certainly would have been interesting to have him in a debate with last year’s speaker Dr Andrew Franklin Miller! On Day 2, Professor Nigg focused on the preferred movement paradigm. Years of investigations (and a lot of bone pins in Scandinavian research participants) have led him to stress that we should forget about the evils of pronation and move away from the concept that we need to re-align patients.

Following the coffee break, Professor Jim Woodburn presented on the importance of biomechanics in inflammatory arthritis. This really brought together how vital biomechanics is in the disease process as he stressed the significance of a “dual strategy” for addressing inflammation and biomechanics in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Professor Woodburn stressed that one third of rheumatoid patients will present in the foot first which gives us a “therapeutic window of opportunity”. His take home points were to treat early and aggressively and that custom made rigid orthoses do work! The following day Dr Woodburn gave us a very informative overview of 3D printed orthoses. This answered a lot of questions particularly as 3D printing is a technology which is now widely used. However… it’s not quite good enough for us to move from traditional methods of orthotic manufacture just yet.

Physio to the Olympic Team James Moore presented next about loading strategies in elite sport. Mr Moore’s engaging lecturing style reinforced that ankle and foot strength is crucial. He went into depth about adapting load for different tissues and to focus patients on performing calf raises to a capacity. Mr Moore’s lectures drew heavily on his extensive clinical experience with top level athletes and we saw this again with his hands on work shop and his lecture on the hip on Day 2. Mr Moore explained in detail that the morphology within the hip joint is essential to understanding its biomechanics and how this varies between individuals.

Summer School favourite and back by popular demand, Simon Bartold spoke about load resolution in running. He suggested that we should be varying repetitive load to decrease running injuries and that we should be focusing on input vibration through footwear or orthoses. Vibration has a direct link to fatigue and this is probably where we will see a lot more research in the future. Mr Bartold also related his lecture to Professor Nigg’s theories on muscle tuning and both speakers made reference to “wobbly mass”. In brief, muscle tuning refers to the theory that muscles respond to impact forces in order to minimize vibrations in the soft tissues (or reducing wobbly mass!!)

To conclude the conference, each speaker gave an overview of how to apply their lectures to clinical practice. Despite the variety of backgrounds and specialisms of our speakers, common themes emerged from all of them. Strong intrinsic foot muscles were a definite take home message along with allowing individuals to function within their preferred plane. James Moore showed us some thought provoking video clips of Olympic competitors in slow motion; it’s fair to say that some very successful athletes don’t fit our image of “biomechanical perfection” yet they break records and aren’t plagued by injury! Definitely food for thought!

Timetable

Friday 22nd June

8:00

Registration

8:20

Welcome

8.30

Prof. Richard Jones

Using clinical biomechanics in the return to sport in novice and elite individuals.

9:15

Dr. Kade Paterson

Role of foot and lower limb biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis.

10:00

Prof. Kim Bennell

Biomechanical interventions for knee osteoarthritis.

10:45

Break

11:15

Prof. Sarah Curran

Chronic ankle instability and classification/ management.

12:00

Dr. Eric Fuller

Treatment of the painful first metatarsal phalangeal joint.

12:45

Taking the Pulse of Podiatry

10 Question Online survey. Results will be collected, correlated and fed back on Saturday morning.

13:00

Lunch

14:00

Workshop 1, 2, 3 & 4

14:45

Break / Move Room

15:00

Workshop 1, 2, 3 & 4

15:45

Break / Move Room

16:00

Workshop 1, 2, 3 & 4

16:45

Break / Move Room

17:00

Workshop 1, 2, 3 & 4

17:45

Close

Saturday 23rd June

8:00

Registration

8:20

Welcome

8.30

Taking the Pulse of Podiatry

Report on findings.

 

8:45

Dr. Simon Spooner & Dr. Eric Fuller

Interactive Session:

Mechanical Modelling for the Busy Clinians.

9:30

Prof. Sarah Curran

Patellofemoral Joint Pain:

Micro vs. Maro Pathology.

10:15

Dr. Simon Spooner

Gait re-training and the injured athlete, what does the science say?

11:00

Break

11:30

Prof. Kim Bennell

Patient Centred Care for the Management of Chronic Musculoskeletal conditions.

12:15

The Great Debate

Lateral wedging: When to do it & how?

13:00

Lunch

14:00

Put it to the Panel

Question & Answer Session with the Experts.

14:45

Break

15:00

Putting Research Into Practice

5 -10 minutes from each speaker to summarise how to apply their lectures into practice.

16:00

Close

Workshop 1: Dr. Kade Paterson

Assessment and treatment of foot osteoarthritis.

Workshop 3: Prof. Richard Jones

Using 2D and visualisation of forces to help to aid management of the individual.

Workshop 2: Dr. Eric Fuller

Prescription writing for foot orthoses using the tissuestress paradigm.

Workshop 4: MSK Specialist Podiatrist Edward Henstridge

Practical Ultrasound: A hands on clinical guide with the opportunity to try the latest technologies available.

Download Timetable PDF
Discounts

- 15% EARLY BIRD (was £594 now £504.90*)

- 25% Group discount (3 or more)

- NHS - Please call for more details

 ( *Price includes VAT - Ends 31st December 2017 )